Image by Harry Gillen

The Hudson

The Hudson is a 315 mile river that originates in the Adirondack Mountains of Upstate New York and flows southward through the Hudson Valley to the Upper New York Bay between New York City and Jersey City, and eventually drains into the Atlantic Ocean at New York Harbor. The lower half of the river is a tidal estuary with two high tides and two low tides per day. She ranges in depth from 30 feet (near the Federal Dam) to 202 feet (in a section knows as “World’s End” between the United States Military Academy and Constitution Island) and is one of the area’s greatest natural resources. 

 

About 220 species of fish can be currently found in the Hudson River, including striped bass and American shad. Marine life is also known to exist in the estuary with seals, crabs, and some whales reported. The Hudson also has a diverse array of habitat types including tidal wetlands of freshwater and salt marshes. In addition, shallow water boaters will discover a breadth of biological diversity such as cattails and cordgrasses. 

 

During the second half of 2021, 11.2 million juvenile oysters were added to a section of the Hudson River off the coast of Lower Manhattan, where they are helping to filter the water and creating habitats for other marine life. Oysters are a symbol of resilience, and a hopeful sign amid ominous news about the country’s waterways in the age of rapid climate change. 

 

In appreciation for the joy and adventure that the Hudson makes possible for boaters, a portion of the proceeds from every charter are donated to to Riverkeeper whose vision is of a Hudson teeming with life, with engaged communities boating, fishing and swimming throughout its watershed.

Image by Greg Nerantzakis
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Riverkeeper protects and restores the Hudson River from source to sea and safeguards drinking water supplies, through advocacy rooted in community partnerships, science and law.

Image by Brandon Jacoby